Article Brief

The NCPA and the Drexel University Sport Management Department released the findings of a joint study showing that the NCAA uses amateurism as a tool to deny revenue athletes billions of dollars per year that they would otherwise receive in a fair market.

The NCPA and the Drexel University Sport Management Department released the findings of a joint study showing that the NCAA uses amateurism as a tool to deny revenue athletes billions of dollars per year that they would otherwise receive in a fair market.  Major findings, the complete study, and data by all FBS colleges and conferences are available below.

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Study Documents:

Study Highlights:

  • The average full athletic scholarship at an FBS school left “full” players with a scholarship shortfall (out-of-pocket expenses) of $3285 during the 2011-12 school year.
  • FBS football and men’s basketball players would receive full athletic scholarships plus an additional $6 billion between 2011-15 if not for the NCAA’s prohibition of a fair market.
  • The lost value over a four-year career for the average FBS football and men’s basketball player is $456,612 and $1,063,307, respectively.
  • The lost value over a four-year career for the average football and men’s basketball player in the six BCS conferences is $715,000 and $1.5 million, respectively.
  • University of Texas football players will be denied approximately $2.2 million, incur scholarship shortfalls of over $14,000, and live below the federal poverty line by $784 per year between 2011-15.
  • University of Louisville men’s basketball players will be denied approximately $6.5 million, incur scholarship shortfalls of over $17,000, and live below the federal poverty line by $3730 per year between 2011-15.